Tao Te Ching 10

Can you coax your mind from its wandering and keep to the original oneness? Can you let your body become supple as a newborn child’s? Can you cleanse your inner vision until you see nothing but the light? Can you love people and lead them without imposing your will? Can you deal with the most…

Tao Te Ching 9

Fill your bowl to the brim and it will spill. Keep sharpening your knife and it will blunt. Chase after money and security and your heart will never unclench care about people’s approval and you will be their prisoner Do your work, then step back the only path to serenity.

SANZEN-IN TEMPLE GARDEN

In former times, a day-long journey through a narrow, mountain pass along the Takano River was the only approach from Kyoto to Ohara. The village’s farmers, woodcutters, and charcoal makers supplied the city’s temples with food, lumber, and fuel. Shaded by the Eastern Mountains, Ohara is just elevated enough to be a bit cooler than…

Tao Te Ching 8

The supreme good is like water which nourishes all things without trying to. It is content with the low places that people disdain. Thus it is like the Tao. In dwelling, live close to the ground. In thinking, keep to the simple. In conflict, be fair and generous. In governing, don’t try to control. In…

Tao Te Ching 7

The Tao is infinite, eternal. Why is it eternal? It was never born thus it can never die Why is it infinite? it has no desires for itself thus it is present for all beings. The Master stays behind that is why she is ahead She is detached from all things that is why she…

Ginkaku-Ji Pure land Garden, Kyoto

An earthly paradise was the model for this temple’s garden, as for its predecessors, Kinkaku-ji and Byodo-in. Reaching back through the centuries, Buddhist teachings revealed that Amida Buddha, the compassionate Buddha, would descend to help those who invoked his name and welcome them to the Pure Land. Built at the foot rather than atop a…

Nanzen-Ji Temple Garden, Kyoto

Resting in the shade of the Eastern Mountains, Nanzen-ji provides a pleasing contrast to the austere gardens typical of Rinzai-sect Zen temples. Four of the twelve subtemples are open to the public, as are some lovely stroll gardens. Once the villa of Emperor Kameyama (1249–1305), the grounds were converted into a temple after his abdication…