Tsukemono 漬物

Tsukemono (literally “pickled things”) are Japanese preserved vegetables (usually pickled in salt, brine, or a bed of rice bran).They are served with rice as an okazu (side dish), with drinks as an otsumami (snack), as an accompaniment to or garnish for meals, and as a course in the kaiseki portion of a Japanese tea ceremony…

アワビ Awabi

Abalones are shellfish belonging to the family haliotidae, the name of which is derived from the Greek words halios, meaning “sea,” and otos, meaning “ear.” There are about 100 known species worldwide. In Japan, where abalone is called awabi, the major species include kuro awabi, megai awabi, and madaka awabi in the south and Ezo…

Butsudan

If you’ve ever been in a Japanese home – or seen a TV show, film or even anime set in a Japanese home – you’ve likely set eyes on a Buddhist altar, a butsudan. These miniature altars allow Japanese families to pray in the comfort of their own home, and are specifically geared toward the…

Fermented food

All different kinds of fermented food that Japanese people love to eat! Umami!06

ラーメン Rāmen

Ramen is a Japanese dish. It consists of Chinese-style wheat noodles served in a meat or (occasionally) fish-based broth, often flavored with soy sauce or miso, and uses toppings such as sliced pork (チャーシュー chāshū), dried seaweed (海苔 nori), menma (メンマ), and green onions (葱 negi). Nearly every region in Japan has its own variation of…

Regional Fast Food

Inexpensive unique dishes and habits fast and easy from all the regions of Japan!

Japanese Breakfast

What Japanese people used to eat for breakfast and how this changed through the years to reach their modern life.

醤油 Shōyu

Soy sauce is a condiment made from a fermented paste of soybeans, roasted grain, brine, and Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus sojae molds. Soy sauce in its current form was created about 2,200 years ago during the Western Han dynasty of ancient China and spread throughout East and Southeast Asia where it is used in cooking and as…

生け花 Ikebana

Ikebana (生け花, “arranging flowers”) is the Japanese art of flower arrangement, also known as kadō (華道, the “way of flowers”). The tradition dates back to the 7th century when floral offerings were made at altars. Later they were placed in the tokonoma alcove of a home. Ikebana reached its first zenith in the 16th century…